mewafarosh

For all discussions regarding military actions short of war and the Great Game on the North West frontier of India, 1837-1901.

Re: mewafarosh

Postby jf42 » 18 Aug 2014 22:15

Those pesky Mutiny types
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby mike snook » 20 Aug 2014 21:44

jf

The photo of the 15th Punjab Infantry was taken by Mr Beato in the British camp at Talien Hwan, Manchuria, on either 10 or 11 July 1860.

The passage below comes from a letter by Robert Shebbeare VC, to his sister Nelly, which he commenced on 10 July 1860, but sealed for despatch two days later on the 12th. Shebbeare - who had been second in command of the Guides under the remarkable Hodson, when the latter resumed the command of the corps before Delhi, vice Daly wounded, (as well as continuing to function as the army's Head of Intelligence and...oh yes...raising, equipping and commanding a large regiment of Sikh irregular horse in the field) - was the first commandant of the 15th Punjab Infantry. He began raising the regiment in Lahore from November 1857. It was certainly complete by April 1858 and active around Lucknow by about Nov/Dec that year, when of course it was all over bar the shouting. Shebbeare sent fragments of the uniform and the turban home. The former was khaki and the latter 'chocolate'. In 1860 the regiment shipped out via Hong Kong [personal sigh by Snook for one of his fondest remembered stations] to participate in the 2nd China War.

'Signor Beato the photographer is here in the village close by. He wants to take my portrait he says, for his volume of Indian celebrities! [sic] so I am going down in all my war paint this afternoon or tomorrow.'

In fact Beato took at least two excellent group photographs of the Sikhs, as well as a group photo of the European officers. In the second photo of the troops there are a dozen soldiers, one of whom is a boy bugler of about 12/13, as well as three camp followers, including a boy of about eight. There are many more long muskets on display and another corporal with the weapon identified by Rob.

There are 12 European officers including Shebbeare, all wearing turbans and khaki jackets with four strips of braid frogging. The tunic has pointed cuffs and a round collar in a facing colour which might match the turban and might be chocolate (as it definitely had been 2 years earlier). Mr Beato had a new camera, I reckon, or a sharp injection of talent and coaching at the hands of Fenton perhaps!

All this can be seen in a Pen and Sword publication of 2007 called Indian Mutiny and Beyond: The Letters of Robert Shebbeare (ed), Arthur Littlewood.

There jf....bet you never thought you'd know what date the photo was taken on! Maybe I will have a crack at the Ripper murders after all!

As ever

M
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby jf42 » 20 Aug 2014 22:15

Very satisfying and most unexpected. The very date, indeed. I think we should ring for Mrs Hudson to bring one of her excellent pots of tea.

Here is the officers' photo, as published by D. Telegraph with their 2008 review of Indian Mutiny and Beyond: The Letters of Robert Shebbeare (ed), Arthur Littlewood.

news-graphics-2008-_657311a.jpg
news-graphics-2008-_657311a.jpg (40.09 KiB) Viewed 777 times


The book can be acquired at a 65% discount (£6.95) from The NAM Chelsea online bookshop.

http://books.national-army-museum.ac.uk ... 33583.html
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby mike snook » 20 Aug 2014 22:28

'Mrs Hudson, you are considerably in the way...'

One of my favourite lines delivered by Jeremy Brett, assuredly the greatest of them all.

As ever,

M

PS Forgot to say I have recorded a definite sighting of 1st Punjab Cavalry in blue alkaluks on Delhi ridge. Same source describes them as 'mostly Sikhs and Afghans'.
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby jf42 » 20 Aug 2014 23:37

Most excellent.

NAM Chelsea have this, from which Michael Barthorp used some images, sadly in monochrome, for his book
Afghan Wars: And the North-West Frontier 1839-1947.

Views in Kashmir, North-West Frontier India and Afghanistan, 1846-1858 (c). Album of 101 watercolours by Lt Harry Lumsden, 59th Bengal Native Infantry, 1846-1858 (c). Portraits and scenes from the life of Lt (later Lt-Gen Sir) Harry Lumsden, on the Hazara expedition 1846, commanding the Corps of Guides 1846-1852. and on his mission to Kandahar, 1857-1858. (Album dimensions:m 47 x 38 cm)


Drawings and Watercolours 1978-09-18

This will be worth seeing when they re-open for business.
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby mike snook » 22 Aug 2014 02:49

And....the 15th Punjab were at Lat 39 degrees N, Long 122 degrees E when they were photographed. And yes, I do mean really; that's where they were. A date and a position....not bad eh?!!

M
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Re: mewafarosh

Postby jf42 » 22 Aug 2014 12:51

"Shh! You never know who's listening."
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