40 foot

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40 foot

Postby devils own » 04 Apr 2017 19:03

Good Evening All
i have a ancestor Mary Meehan who i believe she married John carberry 40th foot(Waterloo man). They had a son john born around 1817 Glasgow who joined regiment in India 1832 died a Sgt in Ireland 1849,also a daughter born in Hobart to catholic baptism.John died in 1835 in India and she remarried a C/SGT John lovett who died at sea when the regiment was coming home in 1845/6. so the question is:
1 On the musters its got john lovitt wife address as belonging to regiment? What does that mean?
2 If Mary Meehan traveled to Tasmania with the regiment in 1823 would she have had to been married to john to go?
3 What happens to wives after their husbands die?

Kind regards
Paul
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Re: 40 foot

Postby Frogsmile » 04 Apr 2017 21:33

devils own wrote:Good Evening All
i have a ancestor Mary Meehan who i believe she married John carberry 40th foot(Waterloo man). They had a son john born around 1817 Glasgow who joined regiment in India 1832 died a Sgt in Ireland 1849,also a daughter born in Hobart to catholic baptism.John died in 1835 in India and she remarried a C/SGT John lovett who died at sea when the regiment was coming home in 1845/6. so the question is:
1 On the musters its got john lovitt wife address as belonging to regiment? What does that mean?
2 If Mary Meehan traveled to Tasmania with the regiment in 1823 would she have had to been married to john to go?
3 What happens to wives after their husbands die?

Kind regards
Paul


1. If a wife married a soldier with Army 'permission' she was officially taken "on the strength" of the regiment and entitled to a daily half-ration from the unit's vittles. As such her 'address' became the regiment.

2. Yes. Only official wives, 'on the strength', were moved at public expense.

3. They can either re-marry, or return home by free passage (providing they went via the next available trooping season). The vast majority quickly remarried and would usually try to find the highest ranked soldier that they could. This was unsurprising when for many it was the home that they knew, with the rough but kindly company of the other wives and free schooling for their children.

N.B. Many soldiers wives were Irish (as were many of the soldiers in India at that time) and they were renowned for being hardy and resourceful. It was not uncommon for some to outlive several husbands.

You can read further information here: viewtopic.php?f=27&t=6614&p=27240&hilit=Cantonments#p27240
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