Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley

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Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley

Postby jmsheard » 16 Jan 2017 15:19

I'm currently researching a Rifle Officer's sword, once the possession of Viscount Mandeville and later the 8th Duke of Manchester (family name George Victor Drogo Montagu). He appears in Hart's Army Lists over the period 1871 to 1889. At the time of the Zulu War he was Captain in the Huntingdon (Rifles) Militia. Unfortunately I have not been able to find any war service record other than an internet reference which claims he served as Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley and according to a report (??) " was assegaied by a Zulu running amok and shot him".
I'd be very grateful for any information which might verify (or not) his service with Wolseley either in Africa or at home.
Many thanks, John Sheard
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Re: Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley

Postby bill wright » 19 Jan 2017 23:52

Dear John -
My new book, A BRITISH LION IN ZULULAND Sir Garnet Wolseley In South Africa 1879-1880, hit the bookshops 3 days ago (Amberley Publishing, 420 pages, £25).
In all my research reading hundreds of the general`s letters, along with his 1879 Journal, I have come across no record of a "Montagu". That is not to say that your man might not have served the general in some capacity but I doubt highly if he ever was an adc of some kind. Wolseley sailed out with three adcs - Lieutenant A. Creagh R.A. (his nephew); Captain E. Braithwaite, Highland Light Infantry and brevet-Major H. McCalmont, 9th Lancers. I know of no Montagu on staff at any time or among the special service officers who accompanied the general.
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Re: Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley

Postby jmsheard » 20 Jan 2017 15:21

Dear Bill, Thanks so much for your information - I thought it unlikely that a Militia captain would have served overseas in that capacity, unless there was some family connection or influence. As a final shot, is it possible that the name Viscount Mandeville has appeared in any correspondence which you have seen (that's the name I finally found him under in Hart's Army Lists.
Best regards, John
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Re: Aide de Camp to Sir Garnet Wolseley

Postby Isandlwana » 21 Jan 2017 06:27

John,

I thought the name was familiar, it came up when David Truesdale and I were researching Victoria's Harvest.

There was a contemporary report of the incident that you mentioned above which was carried in The Belfast Newsletter. However, despite various internet references and the newspaper report, we could find no actual evidence of the officer's presence in the Zulu War of 1879.

For an engraving of him please see http://www.irishmasonichistory.com/unio ... -1931.html

John Y.
Not theirs to save the day but where they stood, falling, to dye the earth
with brave men's blood for England's sake and duty...
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