The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

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The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

Postby Mark » 28 Oct 2016 22:03

A short article by me about Louis Napoleon, the Prince Imperial of France, published by HistoryNet.com. I hope some of you find it of interest.

http://www.historynet.com/the-death-of- ... lu-war.htm

Mark
Mark Simner BA (Hons) MSc | Web: http://marksimner.me.uk | Twitter @marksimner
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Re: The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

Postby jf42 » 29 Oct 2016 04:03

Thanks, Mark.

Investigating events surroundng this story some years ago, I found it threw up some curious connections.

Prince Louis' mother, the Empress Eugenie, was born Maria Eugenia Montijo de Guzman, Condesa de Teba, scions of a renowned aristocratic family in Spain. Her family were among the afrancesados, Spanish families who had sympathised with the French invaders and were forced to withdraw to France after the defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Peninsula. She subsequently married Louis Napoleon, who later became Emperor Napoleon III of France

Her mother, Maria Mañuela Kirkpatrick, daughter of an American wine merchant in Jerez, claimed descent from the Kirkpatricks of Closeburn in Dumfriesshire, southwest Scotland, who were supporters of Robert Bruce, later king of Scotland. Indeed her ancestor, John Kirkpatrick, won notoriety for responding to the Bruce's admission that, having just dirked his rival John Comyn before the altar of the Greyfriars' kirk in Dumfries, he doubted (believed) he had "killed the Comyn," with the reply, "Doubt? I'll gan in and mak siccar, then."- and duly went in and administered the coup de gras. So the story goes.

Teba, a town in Malaga province from which the Condesa Maria Eugenia drew her title, occupies a curious corner in Scottish history as the place where Robert Bruce's most loyal lieutenant, Sir James Douglas, with a small party of Scots knights and squires, met an untimely end fighting the Moors in 1330. Douglas had journeyed south with the Bruce's embalmed heart in a silver casket around his neck, on a mission to expiate the late king's sins (along, presumably with his own) by making war against the Infidel 'Saracens.'

Douglas died in battle, outnumbered and cut off from the main Christian force, as a result of a momentary error of judgement that led him and his men into that fatal predicament, not unlike Prince Louis,. Douglas' [EDIT: ancestors] successors were later elevated to the Earldom of Galloway.

Three hundred and fifty years later, one of James Douglas' descendants, the Earl of Mar, was involved in the raising of a regiment that came to be known as the 21st Regiment Royal Scotch Fuzileers, or 'The Earl of Mar's Greybreeks'. The regimental district was later established in southwest Scotland (Ayrshire and Galloway). In time their uniform came to comprise trousers of Douglas tartan

In 1879 the 21st were part of Lord Chelmsford's force invading Zululand. it was a detachment of the 21st that recovered the body of Prince Louis following his death on June 1st 1879, and raised a cairn on the spot were he died.

A month after the Prince''s death, a young officer in the Royal Scots Fusiliers.was killed whilst riding unaccompanied between British posts. His name was Lieutenant James Henry Scott Douglas, son of Sir George Douglas, MP and his Spanish wife, Dona Sanchez de Pina.

Assegai, the name given by Europeans to the Zulu stabbing spear (known in the Zulu tongue as iqlwa) derives from the Arab azegaya. This is the name of a broad bladed lance used by Moorish cavalry in the Peninsula during the Middle Ages, which in the C15th travelled south with Portugese traders, down the east coast of Africa and came to be associated with the militant tribes of the interior during the early C19th.

It need hardly be said that it was Zulu assegais that put paid to the lives of both Prnce Louis Napoleon and Lieut. James Henry Scott Douglas.
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Re: The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

Postby Isandlwana » 30 Oct 2016 21:42

jf42,

Interesting little piece, however, can I pick you up on something?

A month after the Prince's death, a young officer in the Royal Scots Fusiliers.was killed whilst riding unaccompanied between British posts. His name was Lieutenant James Henry Scott Douglas, son of Sir George Douglas, MP and his Spanish wife, Dona Sanchez de Pina.


Scott Douglas was not alone, he was accompanied by Corporal William Cotter, 17th Lancers, when they were ambushed near to the deserted kwaMagwaza Mission Station on 30th June 1879.

John Y.
Not theirs to save the day but where they stood, falling, to dye the earth
with brave men's blood for England's sake and duty...
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Re: The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

Postby jf42 » 30 Oct 2016 22:48

Well, indeed. Not that it did him much good. I was thinking more of Lieutenant Douglas not being part of a body of troops.
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Re: The Death of a Prince by Mark Simner

Postby Mark » 31 Oct 2016 12:36

Glad you guys enjoyed my article. As John correctly points out, Louis was not actually commissioned into the British Army but rather held an honorary lieutenancy; I will see if I can get this error rectified in my article. My mistake! :o

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